HMEC 2014 – Program Agenda

HMEC 2014 Agenda (FINAL)

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9th HINDU MANDIR
EXECUTIVES’ CONFERENCE,

Orlando, Florida, Sept 19-21, 2014

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

FRIDAY   9/19/2014

 

 

 

 

 

4:00 PM

Registration

 

Meal

6:00 PM

Dinner

 

Session 1

Fri

7:30 PM

Inaugural Session

Surendra Pandey

Vienna (A+B)

 

Open
the conference with Vedic Mantras and Diya lighting by hosts of the HMEC
2014. Welcome address by the organizing hosts followed by invited talks and
inaugural addresses.

 

1.1

 

Bhavgeet – Mansa Satatam

Virender Chauhan, Ekta Chauhan and
Meera Bhutta

1.2a

 

Invocation Through Vedic Mantras

Ashok Shukla and Bhavin Trivedi

1.2b

 

Collective Gayatri Mantra Chant

All

1.3

 

Deep Prajjwalan

All Co-Host Temples

1.4

 

Blessings 

Jain Sadhvi, Trivikrama Swami, Sri
Sri Ravi Shankar, Sw.Nityananda

1.5

 

Opening Remarks

Braham Aggarwal

1.6

 

Living as a Hindu: Hindu Life
Style

Sohini Sircar

1.7

 

Framework for Hindu Value and
Continuing Education Programs

Vishal Agarwal

1.8

 

Bringing the Community into the
Temple and Temple into the Community

Fred Stella

1.9

 

The Mandirs’ Educational Mandate:
A Broader View

Sadasivanatha Palaniswami

1.10

 

Role of Temples in Hindu Education
– Inaugural Address

Sw. Pratyagbodhananda

 

 

Texas Texts – History or Mystery

Jayakumar

1.11

 

Program Agenda Overview

Nainan Desai

1.12

 

Ashirvachan

Sw. Aksharananda

1.13

 

Instructions

Prakhar Agrawal

 

9:40
PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY PRE-LUNCH PROGRAM

SATURDAY 9/20/2014

Sadhana

6:00 AM

Yoga, Meditation, Devotional Singing

 

Normandy A

 

Dhyan – Meditation

Setnivas Vashist

Normandy B

 

Yoga

Madhu Bansal

London

 

Bhajans – Devotional Singing

Ekta & Virender
Chauhan

 

 

 

 

Meal

7:00 AM

Breakfast

 

 

 

 

 

Session 2

Sat

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Hindu Ambassadors (Panel)

Aditi Banerjee

Vienna (A+B)

 

Today’s
youth are tomorrow’s leaders. We are responsible for nurturing and grooming
future leaders. Awareness of the self builds self-confidence, strong
character and prepares resilient leaders who serve as religious and cultural
ambassadors in every field of life. Many organizations have been successful
in preparing such youth ambassadors allowing them to champion the Hindu
Cause. We need long term vision, institutional mechanisms and resources to
empower Hindu youth. This session will deliberate and focus on the successful
methods and strategies that can be employed to empower our youth.

 

2.1

 

Vision, Strategies and Mechanisms
to Prepare Future Leaders
 

Sri Nandanandan Das

2.2

 

Hindu Identity: What makes me a
Hindu?

Prea Persaud

2.3

 

My Journey as a Young Hindu in
America

Vasu Persaud

2.4

 

Case Study: A Model that Worked

Bhavesh Lad

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 3

Sat

9:00 AM – 10:10 AM

Education: Models of Engagement

Varun Khanna

Vienna (A+B)

 

Dharmic
education is one of the important parts of every temple and religious
organization.  It is an obligation to
the community that the temple serves and tries to meet in various ways. This
session is devoted to deliberation on various models and ways by which
Dharmic education may be imparted in the both temple and university and
school settings. The mode of engagement could range from informal,
experiential learning to formal, classroom type education. The target
students are from the Dharmic communities as well as the Non-Dharmic
communities, varying in gender, age and sampradayas. Finally, balancing the
ancient, time-tested methods with modern technology driven methods is a
challenge.

 

3.1

 

Leaving a Legacy

Samir Asthana

3.2

 

Remote (Extension) Educational
Centers at Temples – HUA

Yashwant Pathak

3.3

 

Hindu Temples and the Academic
Study of Sanatana Dharma

Kalyan  Vishwanathan

3.4

 

Examining Authority, Transmission,
Identity within the Guru and Disciple Relationship

Priya Ramlakhan

3.5

 

Spiritual leadership in the Mandirs

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Swami Parmeshanand Ji

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Break

10:10 AM – 10:30 AM

Relaxation

 

 

 

 

 

Session 4

Sat

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Role of the Mother (Panel)

Pratima Dharm

Vienna (A+B)

 

A
mother’s role in the area of health, nutrition and spiritual practices will
be the key to this presentation. The goal for this session is for youths as
well as parents to understand the key role of a mother and how it shapes a
life of a person.   Teachings of puja,
rituals, mantras, cultural, love as well as
fundamental values such sacrifice selfless service to others are the
key to a child’s success in life.
Modeling the values and behavior is the most effective way to instill
the teachings in a person.  The session
will share ideas and best practices in accomplishing a mother’s role in
raising a child successfully.

 

4.1

 

Integrating
adhyatma with practical living

Madhu Sharma

4.2

 

Respect for systematic education
on Rituals (Mantras, Poojas, Homas)

Taru Joshi

4.3

 

The Mother on Motherhood

Kalyani Dwivedi

4.4

 

Hindu parenting and the role of
the Mother

Swami Svatmavidyananda

 

 

Q & A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 5

Sat

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

HMEC Update

Vipul Patel

Vienna (A+B)

 

Understand
and track HMEC action plans and results from various past initiatives. Many
creative ideas and projects have emanated from HMEC over the past 9  years. Some of these have become
significant movements in their own right whether it be the Hindu Mandir
Priest Conference, the Hindu Chaplaincy Initiative, the Hindu Prayer Book for
Hospitals or the Bal Vihar Network or Hindu Women’s Network. This session
provides a glimpse of these projects.

 

5.1

 

3rd Hindu Mandir Priest Conference
2014

Praful Desai

5.2

 

Seva Diwas – Successes of Blood
Drive through Temples

Rahul Jindal

5.3

 

Awareness: World Hindu News

Rahul Chandra

5.4

 

Vanaprasthi Network Vision – HAVAN

Hansa Dave

5.5

 

Being Visible: Public Relations

Utsav Chakrabarti

5.7

 

Hindu Chaplaincy Program for
Community and Colleges

Shama Mehta

5.8

 

The Generational Shift – From
Rituals and Prayers, to Symbolism… and Back

Vibhu Agrawal

5.9

 

Overview of Parallel Sessions

 

 

 

 

 

Meal

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY POST-LUNCH PROGRAM

SATURDAY 9/20/2014

Parallel Tracks – Break Out Sessions (A, B, C, D)

 

 

 

 

Session 6A

Sat

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Teaching & Training

Vishnu Hardowar

Vienna (A)

 

This
session is deliberating on  education
training program to facilitate Hindu youth to be comfortable with the voice
and script of the languages of Hindu Prayers, Samskar’s and Scriptures: a
professional specialized education portfolio in early and High-school  education. There is a need to develop
specialized and context appropriate education tools. The outcome needs to be
vocabulary, literature, training programs and trainer-teacher-manuals along
with certifications. Samskrutham needs to be taught as Prayer and Spiritual
language of Vedic tradition. This session deliberates on various themes
related to these issues.  Currently,
there is a critical need to build education-training component for the
priests to engage, explain and communicate these aspects along with ritual
services to the youth especially.  

 

6A.1

 

Training Programs for Priest and
Others

Pt. Chandra Persad

6A.2

 

Explaining the annual religious
activities programs at the temples

BVK Sastry

6A.3

 

How to Ensure Children are
Learning Sanatan Dharma

Gaura Bhavani

6A.4

 

Preservation Of Bharatiya
Sanskriti through Samskrit

Satish Rapalli

6A.5

 

Hindu American Temple School
Curriculum

Vishal Agarwal

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 6B

Sat

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Role of Temples in Social Adjustment

Durga Parimi

Vienna (B)

 

As
recent immigrants, our community is unfamiliar with effective ways to deal
with the challenges of a Western / American society. Majority of them do
visit the local Hindu Temples fairly regularly. These temples, through
community involvement,  can assist  in many ways such as, coping with and
reducing stressful situations through traditional practices; referrals to the
right resources available via local city, county, and federal agencies;
private non-profit organizations or caring individuals. The benefits of
offering such services are enormous for all members and their families and
growth of the temple.

 

6B.1

 

Finding Your Dharma

Varun Khanna

6B.2

 

Temples and The Power of Education

Ranjani Saigal

6B.3

 

B2A: Connecting Alumni of / to
Temples, Bal Vihars and Camps

Preya Dave

6B.4

 

Creating a Supportive &
Engaging Environment for Children

Devyani Desai

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 6C

Sat

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

A Multi Tradition Perspective (Panel)

Sant Gupta

Normandy (A)

 

Experts,
teachers from a mix of traditions share their perspective on the Educational
Best Practices: the curriculum, the materials, teachers, the quality, the
challenges faced.

 

6C.1

 

The Generational Shift – From
Rituals and Prayers, to Symbolism… and Back

Vibhu Agrawal

6C.2

 

Schooling for Hindu Children in
Guyana: The Challenges

Pandit Aditya Persaud

6C.3

 

Catholic Studies: Teaching Best
Practices

Jody Breaud

6C.4

 

Youth Programs at the Arya Samaj
Temple, Broward County

Bhai Chan Singh

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 6D

Sat

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Youth I – “Bridging the Gap”

Satesh Jadonath

Normandy (B)

 

This
session will attempt to go beyond the usual discourse and discussion about
“bridging the gap” and attempt to identify that cause so that a
solution can then be constructed. • Connecting the east and west culture in a
more focused methodology. • Religion classes in modern temples- what are the
classes/ programs at temples around the USA, what works, what are things to
improve upon. • How to apply hindu teaching in a modern world.

 

6D.1

 

Distinguishing between
information, knowledge, and wisdom

Jaymin Kathiria

6D.2

 

Connecting the east and west
culture in a more focused methodology

Shivani Desai

6D.3

 

How to apply hindu teaching in a
modern world

Chadesh Persaud

 

 

Discussion & Action

 

 

 

 

 

Session 7A

Sat

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Education – Best Practices

Pochi Subbarayan

Vienna (A)

 

The
role of Hindu education is to build a brighter future for our youth. The need
for effective educational resources, knowledge management and delivery of
foundations of Hinduism and spirituality for Hindu American children is
enormous. The course materials need to be authentic, accurate, high quality,
easily accessible and available across the country. Alongside the actual
practices of spirituality should be encouraged and emphasized in temples.
Such educational models, worthy of emulation, exist around the country: ways
of teaching Hindu Dharma as a universal tradition and its values in a way
that is meaningful to Hindu American youth. The curriculum should be
age-appropriate and pedagogically sound. Effective knowledge management and
delivery of foundations of Hinduism and spirituality to our children.

 

7A.1

 

South Florida Hindu temple
Education Curriculum

Smeeta Patel

7A.2

 

Jain Vishwa Bharti Curriculum

Devendra Mehta

7A.3

 

B.A.P.S. Educational Best
Practices that have worked well and lessons learned

Kamalbhai Ruparellia

7A.4

 

Bal Vihar/Bal Gokul Curriculum

Bhakti Mehta

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 7B

Sat

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Mandir Etiquette & Best Practices

Kumar Dave

Vienna (B)

 

Ours
is a culture of respect, acceptance and gratitude. It values purity (saucha)
and dignity (maryada): observance of propriety, politeness and good taste in
conduct or appearance. Cleanliness, orderliness, timeliness, regularity. How
can the temple community help in sustaining and further fostering these
values. The temple visitor guide should address/cover all the above issues in
the form of individual booklet. Basically these are do’s and don’ts of the
Mandir routine operation.

 

7B.1

 

Best practices/observations from
various mandirs

Arun Jain

7B.2

 

Safety, Security &
Environmental Practices in the Sikh Gurudwara

Navtej Singh

7B.3

 

Etiquette & Cleanliness in
Temples and Institutions

Aruna Mehta

7B.4

 

Best Practices in Planning &
Operating Mandir Kitchen

Vijay Oza

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 7C

Sat

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Collaborating with Other Institutions

Shantia Singh

Normandy (A)

 

Every
Temple/Mandir begins their journey with a goal to provide religious services
and fulfill spiritual education for their community. Ashrams are immense
repositories of ancient wisdom, knowledge and serve as spiritual centers.
Collaborating with ashrams can help the devotees both young and old with
religious and spiritual knowledge, train teachers. Often mandirs in
USA/Canada/Caribbean States do not have authentic organic materials for
conducting abhishekams, homa. Supporting organic growers of Tulasi and Cow
sanctuaries (protecting cows is one of our dharma’s)  is a win-win proposition for organic
producers and consumers (mandirs). Similarly engaging directors, producers in
documenting our heritage, mandir architecture, nurturing spiritual aspects,
unity among Hindus and good community citizenry is critical for our loner
term sustenance and growth.

 

7C.1

 

Collaborations with other NGOs and
United Nations

Swami Parmeshanand Ji

7C.2

 

The ways in which Temples and
Ashram could collaborate.

Brahmacari Suryanarayana

7C.3

 

State of Hindu Temples in Guyana

Rabindranath Persaud

7C.4

 

Hindu Awareness Yatra (Lecture
Tour): Hindu Scholars Bureau

Promod Dubey

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 7D

Sat

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Youth II – “Engineering the Future”

Vishaal Gupta

Normandy (B)

 

How
do we envision ourselves in 10, 20, or 30 years? What do we expect from our
temples and organizations? More importantly, what do we expect from
OURSELVES? What does it even mean for Hindu dharma to be sustained, and are
we equipped with the requisite spiritual and knowledge capital to carry out
this task? These are only a sampling of the myriad questions before our
generation – questions that can only be answered through introspection and a
self-journey.

• Creating a national framework (North, South, East, West and Central) of
coordinators who can use their networks to help foster more Hindu youth
involvement. • How to foster passion in the youth – this will help bring more
like minded folk together which will in turn build friendships amongst youth
whom they might not have met previously.

 

7D.1

 

Engineering the Future

Ruti Dwivedi

7D.2

 

Why am I a Hindu: Hindu Identity;
Arming Against Pitfalls

Pandit Ganesh Jadonath

7D.3

 

Engineering the Future at Shri
Surya Narayan Mandir

Varun Hardowar

7D.4

 

To Believe or Not To Believe

Niyati Shah

 

 

Discussion & Action

 

 

 

 

 

Meal

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Afternoon Tea and Snacks

 

Parallel Workshops – (A, B, C, D)

 

 

 

 

Session 8A

Sat

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Temple Operations

Mythili Bachu

Vienna (A)

 

The
Temple Operation has marked similarities to any corporation. It has
management (BOT / EB), paid and unpaid ‘employees’ (Priests, Managers, etc.),
Clients (Devotees of all age group / Congregation), collects funds (donation and
sponsorships) and provides (Religious, Spiritual, Educational, cultural,
social and other) services. Therefore, it must develop short- and long-
strategies to achieve its goals & vision once defined. Metrics are
essential to measure success and provides guidance for any changes required.
Effective communication helps attract and retain volunteers. Periodic surveys
help getting the pulse of the temple goers and provide guidance for resource
allocation and focus for best results.

 

8A.1

 

Long term strategy of Hindu
Temples

Pawan K Rattan

8A.2

 

Metrics for success of temple
operations: spiritual metrics, education programs

Vishnu Ramnarine

8A.3

 

“The leadership &
technology” it takes to operate a temple

Muthusamy Swami

8A.4

 

Creating Booklets: Example Hindu
Deities (HUA)

Braham Aggarwal

8A.5

 

Provisional

Prakash Tailor

 

 

Discussion & Action

 

 

 

 

 

Session 8B

Sat

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Hindu Chaplaincy

Abhijit Pandya

Vienna (B)

 

Certify
knowledgeable and willing Hindu Sevaks to serve broader community needs.
Hindu Chaplains serve the spiritual needs of the Hindu American community in
settings away from the temples: in hospitals, nursing homes, educational
institutions, and the military. HMEC-HAF have established a framework of
authorized Hindu Bodies to provide the necessary education, training and
endorsement to Hindu Chaplains. This initiative requires the collaboration of
religious and community leaders, institutions and temples across the country.
Community support is critical to encouraging aspiring Hindu American
chaplains who can serve wherever the community has a need. Hindu Chaplain in
the university setting offers Hindu Students to continue to grow spiritually
within a safe space and facilitates worships services and learning of
spiritual texts. They also provide spiritual counseling in an open and  suitable manner to the academic
environment.

 

8B.1

 

Becoming a Hindu Chaplain (Program
at HUA)

Swami Sarvaananda

8B.2

 

Educating the Main Stream about
Hindu Tradition and History

Tejomaya Sri

8B.3

 

My experience as a Volunteer
Buddhist Chaplain

Frank Tedesco

8B.4

 

Hindu Chaplaincy and SAMFSN

Pratima Dharm

8B.5

 

Community Needs: one place to go
for spiritual needs

Madhu Sharma

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 8C

Sat

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Outreach/Inreach

Fred Stella

Normandy (A)

 

In
this session we will show the importance of interacting with our local
communities.  This is one of the best
ways to educate non-Hindus about Hindu Dharma. It is face-to-face,
people-to-people connections that make the difference. The following subjects
will be covered: How to conduct an effective temple tour; Lecturing on the
Sanatana Dharma; Interfaith Interaction; Outreach to schools, colleges,other
faith-based communities, civic groups, etc.; Partnering with community
organizations on seva projects; Collaborative Festivals; Media Relations;
Local government relations. To serve and be served. Temples need to be
welcoming, provide materials on Hinduism and develop long-term relationships
with the community/non-Hindus. How to create “one size fits all” material or
do we?  Material that is accurate,
relevant and professional. Temples inviting journalists, and interfaith,
government, and educational leaders to events – not just as a one-time thing,
but to build lasting relationships, so temple leadership/membership can
better understand the needs of the community that they are part of, and to
develop go-to people to share the concerns of the Hindu community

 

8C.1

 

Outreach: Temple community
outreach to  Interfaith, colleges,
visits

Sunil Lala

8C.2

 

Collaborating with Cow Sanctuaries
and Organic Growers

Bobbie Srinivasan

8C.3

 

Sewa International

Yashwant Belsare

8C.4

 

Educating the needy: Ekal
Vidyalaya

Vinod Jhunjhunwala

8C.5

 

Role of Media and Its Impact

Hemant Pandya

 

 

Discussion & Action

 

 

 

 

 

Session 8D

Sat

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Workshopping the Hindu youth

Preya Dave

Normandy (B)

 

The
sheer volume of the amassed knowledge and wisdom contained in Hindu thought
is staggering, often to the point of being so daunting as to put-off many
youth from pursuing any form of true education regarding Hindu dharma. Yet
there must be effective ways to learn and disseminate this information,
beyond rote memorization and recitation of facts. We will attempt to tease
out some novel ways of learning about our dharma in a fun, interactive way. •
Unraveling the popular Hindu festivals in college: Garba, Holi, Diwali,
Raksha Bandhan, Uttarayan, Pongal etc. Creating flyers/ communications that
could aid the Hindu organizations in correctly presenting the Hindu
festivals. This will help keep the sanctity of the events, and also bring
awareness of the reasoning behind the holidays. • Understanding Hinduism in
pop culture- breaking stereotypes between Hinduism versus Indian

 

8D.1

 

Finding Your Dharma

Varun Khanna

8D.2

 

Dharma Bee – An innovative quiz
competition for children

Sreevidya Radhakrishna

8D.3

 

Engaging Youth in Gayatri Parivar,
USA

Preeya Patel

8D.4

 

Experience in student leadership at
Duke

Amol Yadav

 

 

Discussion & Action

 

 

 

 

 

 

5:30 PM – 6:30 PM

Freetime – Networking

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY EVENING

Session 9

Sat

6:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Gala Dinner Program

 

 

6:30 PM

Registration

 

Meal

7:00 PM

Dinner &  Light
Entertainment

 

Vienna (A+B)

8:00 PM

Cultural Program & Invited Speakers

 

 

 

Introduction, Prayer

 

gala.1

 

Kathak Dance, Tabla Recital, Sitar
Recital

Nand Kishor Muley & Students

gala.2

 

Blessings 

Jyotirmayanand Ji, Pranav Pandya

gala.3

 

Proclamation by the Mayor of Orlando, FL

 

Hon.  Rick Singh

gala.4

 

Dance: Ishtadev Pranam

Gita Raj and Students

gala.5

 

About HMEC

Sharma Tadepalli

gala.6

 

Building Understanding through
Hindu Mandir Network – HMEC

Bawa Jain

gala.7

 

Sanatan Dharma Scholarship Winners

Tej Tanden, Harsh Dave

gala.8

 

Devotional Songs

Surabhi Adesh & Group

gala.9

 

Vote of Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

9:45 PM

End

 

 

 

 

 

SUNDAY MORNING PROGRAM

SUNDAY 9/21/2014

Sadhana

6:00 PM

Yoga, Meditation, Devotional Singing

 

Normandy A

Dhyan – Meditation

Setnivas Vashist

Normandy B

 

Yoga

Jaimini Marolia

London

 

Bhajans – Devotional Singing

Ekta & Virender Chauhan

Meal

7:00 AM

Breakfast

 

 

 

 

 

Session 10

Sun

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Teaching Hinduism in Universities (Panel)

Basant Tariyal

Vienna (A+B)

 

With
the increasing academic awareness of Hinduism, many universities and colleges
offer courses on the subject which are often taught by non-Hindu
practitioners. This session aims to gain an understanding of the perspective
and experiences of the professors.
What is their view of education?
What resources do they currently use and what would they like to see
in the future?  What challenges and
opportunities exist? What is the experience of Hindu practitioners who teach
these courses and could there be knowledge/resources shared across both?  Lastly, explore the process in which Hindu
temples and community can support them in overcoming the difficulties faced
by them.

 

10.1

 

Hinduism as perceived by me (the
teacher)

Adriene Z. Tribble

10.2

 

Challenges in teaching Hinduism to
Non Hindus

Richard Grego

10.3

 

Teaching Hindu Traditions at
Stetson University: 22 Years of Challenge and Opportunity

Phillip Lucas

10.4

 

How can Hindu temples and
community help in overcoming these challenges

Chris Bell

10.5

 

Hindu Studies at Eckerd College

Amy Langenberg

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 11

Sun

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Developing Common Content Collectively

Ami Patel

Vienna (A+B)

 

Hinduism
is primarily based on transference of knowledge from one generation to the
next. In doing so it requires to develop a proper ‘content’ taking into
account – the current needs and future requirements. The content so developed
by collective endeavor should be ‘inclusive’ of all commonly acceptable
tconcepts, teaching and practices. This is a big challenge necessitating the
support of modern day techniques of knowledge management and also proper
technological support.

 

11.1

 

The Power of Hinduism for Today’s
Youth

Ashish Yamdagini

11.2

 

Form and Structure of Common
Teaching Material: documentaries, books, aids

Ma Prematma Swami

11.3

 

Methodology and Process of
Developing Content

Senthilnatha Swami

11.4

 

Empowered learning and community
development through Dharmic Seva at energy conscious Temples with enhanced
security

Anju Bhargava

 

 

Q & A

 

 

 

 

 

Relaxation

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Break

 

 

 

 

 

Session 12

Sun

10:15 AM -11:15 PM

Developing Common Infrastructure Collectively

Nainan Desai

Vienna (A+B)

 

A
great investment of time is needed to locate authentic and reliable
Hindu-centric information from search engines. Adversarial websites have been
setup to spread disinformation about Hinduism as well. There is a need to
establish infrastructure of authenticity rated  Hindu
centric knowledge base in succinct form. The infrastructure would
include authenticity ratings, peer reviewers, networked libraries at
temples, technology know how’s, databases of writers, publishers, producers,
artists, availability of courses, degree programs, and business plan for
information clearing house.

 

12.1

 

Hindu Library Network – Digital
Libraries

Robert Arnett

12.2

 

Distribution, Clearing House
System for Education Material

Ram Prakash Agarwal

12.3

 

Media & Technology Infusion
Case Study: Temples of North America

Gayatri Pandey

12.4

 

Authenticity Ratings

Vishnu Sharma

12.5

 

Social Media to Engage Youth and
Pointers to Appropriate Hindu Websites

Sasnarine Persaud

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

 

 

Session 13

Sun

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

HMEC 2014 Closure Session

Umesh Shukla

Vienna (A+B)

 

Review
the action items and resolutions. Conclude with blessings and parting
thoughts from Swami Ji.

 

13.1

 

Correcting Misrepresentations
& “Constructing” Hinduism in America’s Classrooms

Nikhil Joshi

13.2

 

Dharmo Rakshati Rakshitah

Shri Narayancharandas

13.3

 

Action Items and Resolutions

Sanjay Mehta, Youth

13.4

 

Resolution from Trinidad &
Tobago & Blessings

Pandit Amar Seepersad

13.5

 

Shanti Mantra

 

13.6

 

Announcements & Thanks

Dhananjay Joshi

 

 

 

 

 

12:15 PM

End